Holocaust Remembrance Day

Holocaust Remembrance Day is a day to remember the victims of the Holocaust. It is observed on the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, which was a revolt by Jews in Poland against the Nazis in 1943. The date was chosen by Israel, and it changes based on the Hebrew calendar. In 2014, it begins on April 27 and concludes on the 28th.

In the United States, Congress set up the Days of Remembrance, a week-long commemoration of the tragedy of the Holocaust. The Days of Remembrance are held during the week that Holocaust Remembrance Day falls. The week is set aside for ceremonies and contemplation of the tragedy.

In Israel, ceremonies are held and Israeli television airs only Holocaust-related programs on Holocaust Remembrance Day. A siren is sounded across the country at 11:00 A.M. Pedestrians and traffic stop for two minutes to pay tribute to the Holocaust victims.

High school students from around the world travel to Poland to participate in the March of the Living, a march through Auschwitz, largest concentration camp set up by the Nazis.

The goal of Holocaust Remembrance Days around the world is to make sure that we never forget the Holocaust, and that we learn about it, so that it will never happen again.

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